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2017 Cognitive Neuroscience Spring Retreat And Annual KIBM Symposium On Innovative Research

Saturday, May 13, 2017
8:45am to 4:30pm

This retreat is sponsored by the NIH Cognitive Neuroscience Training Program of the Institute for Neural Computation and follows in the tradition of the retreats sponsored by the McDonnell-Pew Center for Cognitive Neuroscience.
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See past events here...

2017 Rockwood Memorial Lecture

Dr. Christof Koch - Big Science, Team Science, Open Science: In the Service of Neuroscience (4/17/17)
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2017 MURI Winter School 2017 - Dynamics of Multifunction Brain Networks

More... (Click here for MURI 2017 School Poster)

 


2016 MURI Winter Workshop on Memory Consolidation

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Annual Joint Symposium On Neural Computation

The Institute's Annual Research Symposium provides members with the latest research efforts over the past year. This all day event held in May is open to the INC members and the Industrial Affiliate Program members.
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Annual IEM-INC CANE Minisymposium

The minisymposium highlights latest advances and emerging directions in brain-machine and neuron-silicon interface technology and their applications to neuroscience and neuroengineering.
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H. Paul Rockwood Memorial Lectureship

INC sponsors the H. Paul Rockwood Memorial Lectureship held annually. The Rockwood Memorial Lectureship Fund was gifted to the Institute by Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Rockwood in memory of their late son's interest, studies, and work in the neural computation field.
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INC / Calit2 Seminar Series

The Institute for Neural Computation (INC) and the UCSD Division of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) are launching a lecture series focused on "The Operating System of the Brain.". Coordinating the Calit2/INC Lecture Series is Javier R. Movellan, Director of the Machine Perception Laboratory, located in the Calit2 building at UCSD.

The goal of this series is to explore how the brain organizes its network of sensors and actuators to produce adaptive behavior in real time. Understanding how the brain solves this problem may help develop a new generation of robots capable of assisting people in everyday life. The series will include speakers from diverse areas including neuroscience, behavioral science, control theory, computer science, robotics and computer animation.
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INC Chalk Talk Series

The INC chalk talk series meets bi-weekly as a forum for interactive exchange on all aspects of neural computation. The purpose of these meetings is to foster the collaborative interactions between INC members and with colleagues across campus, and to stimulate new ideas and research initiatives. Each meeting features one of the core or affiliated INC faculty labs/groups, with informal presentation of late-breaking research and new research directions. The meetings are open to the community, and we encourage broad participation across campus. Contact: chalkinc.ucsd.edu for further information, or to schedule a presentation.

When: Thursdays bi-weekly Fall through Spring
Where: SDSC East Building, E-145, UCSD
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INC Seminar Series

The Institute maintains a lively seminar series that has brought to the campus distinguished researchers working at the forefront of neural computation. The seminar series program, held weekly, attracts an audience from the campus, industry, and the general public. Due to the widespread popularity of this program, INC now videotapes the lectures and maintains a videotape library for its members' use. Over 70 lectures are on file in the INC library.
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Joint INC-IEM Neuroengineering Seminar Series

If you would like to be added to the INC Seminar Series Mailing list send an email message to: seminars{at}inc.ucsd.edu More...

 

Mozart & The Mind

Mozart and the Mind annually brings together internationally leading figures in the sciences, medicine, and the arts to communicate contemporary research and insights exploring the impact of music on our brain, health, and lives. Topics include the role of music in therapy and rehabilitation; musical training's role in improving brain function; what brain structures underlie rhythm and music perception; how advances in cognitive neuroscience and neurotechnology can open new possibilities for musical expression and performance; and much more.
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PAST EVENTS

 

2017 Cognitive Neuroscience Spring Retreat and Annual KIBM Symposium on Innovative Research Saturday, May 13, 2017

More...

 

Annual IEEE Biometical Circuits and Systems (BioCAS) Conference (11/10-12/2011)

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems (TBioCAS) publishes peer-reviewed manuscripts reporting original and transformative research at the intersection between the life sciences and circuits and systems engineering principles.
2011 Conference...

Annual Minisymposium on New Dimensions in Brain-Machine Interfaces

The minisymposium highlights latest advances and emerging directions in brain-machine and neuron-silicon interface technology and their applications to neuroscience and neuroengineering. Topics include high-dimensional EEG and ECoG systems, wireless and unobtrusive brain-machine interfaces, flexible bioelectronics, real-time decoding of brain and motor activity, and signal processing methods for intelligent human-system interfaces. More...

 

NEURON Summer Course

In five days of intensive lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on exercises, this course will cover the principles and practice of the design, construction, and use of models in the NEURON simulation environment. It is intended primarily for those who are concerned with models of biological neurons and neural networks that are closely linked to empirical observations, e.g. experimentalists who wish to incorporate modeling in their research plans, and theoreticians who are interested in the principles of biological computation.More...

Annual IEEE Biometical Circuits and Systems (BioCAS) Conference (11/10-12/2011)

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems (TBioCAS) publishes peer-reviewed manuscripts reporting original and transformative research at the intersection between the life sciences and circuits and systems engineering principles.
2011 Conference...

 

Qualcomm/Brain Corporation/INC Lecture Series on Computational Neuroscience - More...

 

 


Click on additional event titles below to expand and collapse each section.

(01/22-23/16) TDLC All Hands Meeting

TDLC All Hands Meeting

Was held January 22-23, 2016, at the San Diego Supercomputer Center East. For additional information and registration please visit the TDLC Website.

 

(12/03/2015) 2015 MURI Winter Workshop on Memory Consolidation

2015 MURI Winter Workshop on Memory Consolidation

For additional information and registration please click here.

 

(Sept 25-27 2015) Mozart and the Mind

Mozart and the Mind

(Sept 25-27 2015) Mozart and the Mind - Mozart, Prodigy Among Prodigies

 

(06/10-12/2015) 14th Brain Connectivity Workshop will be hosted by the Swartz Center

14th Brain Connectivity Workshop will be hosted by the Swartz Center

More info

 

(04/24/2015) Rockwood Memorial Lecture

(12/03/2015) 2015 MURI Winter Workshop on Memory Consolidation

2015 MURI Winter Workshop on Memory Consolidation

For additional information and registration please click here.

 

(05/18/2014) Convergence Music Symposium: A Multidisciplinary Dialogue on Music

Convergence Music Symposium: A Multidisciplinary Dialogue on Music

May 18, 2014

 

9:00 AM – 7:00 PM at the UCSD Conrad Prebys Music Center, 127 (map)

 

The Temporal Dynamics of Learning Center and the Department of Music at UC San Diego, in collaboration with Mozart & the Mind present Convergence: a multidisciplinary dialogue on music.

This symposium brings together academic researchers, composers, educators and clinicians in a series of panels examining interdisciplinary crossroads between music, composition, education, health and cognitive neuroscience.

Featured panelists include: David Borgo, Diana Deutsch, Dane Harwood, Carl Hermanns, Mari Jones, Layne Kalbfleisch, Lei Liang, Andy McGraw, Gabriella Mussachia, Roger Reynolds, Katharina Rosenberger, Michael Thaut, Concetta Tomaino, and more.

For additional information and registration please visit the Convergence website.

 

 

(02/20/2014) The cortical control of speech articulation (webcast)

The cortical control of speech articulation

Speaker: Dr. Kristofer Bouchard, Department of Neurological Surgery, UCSF


Location: Large conference room, Center for Neural Circuits and Behavior (CNCB)


Date: Feb 20th, 2014


Time: 11am - noon

Presented by The Center for Brain Activity Mapping, the Kavli Institute for Brain and Mind, and the Institute for Neural Computation

 

Webcasted: http://neurostream.ucsd.edu/liveplayer.html?source=neuro

 

The cortical control of speech articulation

 

Abstract:
Speaking is one of the most complex actions we perform, and although nearly all of us learn to do it effortlessly, little is known about the cortical control of speech articulation. Here, we used high-resolution, multi-electrode recordings directly from the cortical surface during the production of consonant-vowel syllables to understand how the human brain controls speech articulation. We present results on the functional, dynamic organization of speech sensory-motor cortical activity controlling individual articulators and generating syllables.
We describe results of single-trial cortical prediction of speech (formant decoding) and examine how the activity generating a speech segment depends on surrounding segments.

Dr. Bouchard's research is unique in using high-temporal and high-spatial resolution electrophysiological recordings in humans to investigate the neural basis of a behavior that is exclusive of humans. High-resolution recordings are indispensable for this investigation, since speech articulator representations are localized in a very small patch (5 x 5 mm) of the ventral sensorimotor cortex, and speech requires an extremely precise coordination between articulators in the vocal tract (lips, tongue, jaw, and larynx).

Dr. Bouchard will be at UCSD on Thursday 2/19 and Friday 2/21. Please email Joaquin Rapela (rapela@ucsd.edu) if you would like to meet the speaker.

 

Short biographical sketch:

Dr. Bouchard obtained his Bachelors degree in Mathematics and Cognitive Science from Brandeis University, where he worked with Dr. Larry Abbott on neural network models of learning and memory. He completed his Ph.D in Neuroscience at UCSF with the advise of Dr. Michael Brainard, where he designed and conducted neural recording experiments to examine the representation of produced vocal sequences in songbird sensory-motor circuits. Additionally, during his PhD he performed behavioral and neural network studies of sequence production and learning. As a postdoctoral fellow with Dr. Edward Chang at UCSF he has investigated mesoscale (i.e. intermediate) functional organization and processing in human sensory-motor cortex during speech production in neurosurgical patients chronically implanted with electrocorticography (ECoG) grids. More recently, he has been designing and conducting simultaneous mECoG and laminar probe electrophysiological recordings with optical manipulations in rodent models.
Dr. Bouchard's long-term research goal is to understand how mesoscopic organization and computation in sensory-motor cortex arises from microscopic circuit properties during learning and performance of behavior.

 

Dr. Bouchard is at UCSD until Friday 2/21. Please email
Joaquin Rapela (rapela@ucsd.edu) if you would like to meet the speaker.

---

Organized by:
UCSD Center for Brain Activity Mapping, http://cbam.calit2.net
UCSD Kavli Institute for Brain and Mind, http://kibm.ucsd.edu
UCSD Institute for Neural Computation, http://inc.ucsd.edu

Sponsored by:
Qualcomm Inc., http://www.qualcomm.com
Brain Corporation, http://www.braincorporation.com

 

(01/27/2014) Announcing the NSF/NIH/BMBF/ANR/BSF Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience program

Announcing the NSF/NIH/BMBF/ANR/BSF Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience program

Deadline for proposals will be JANUARY 27, 2014.

 

Dear Colleagues,
The U.S. National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health, the German Ministry of Education and Research (Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, BMBF), the French National Research Agency (Agence Nationale de la Recherche, ANR), and the United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF) are pleased to announce the release of the program solicitation for Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience (CRCNS; NSF 14-504), now available at http://www.nsf.gov/crcns/.

 

The next deadline for proposals will be JANUARY 27, 2014.


The new solicitation extends the CRCNS program for a period of three years (2014-2016), including what had previously been solicited under a separate Dear Colleague Letter on French-US Collaboration in Computational Neuroscience. Proposals for US-Israel projects are also now supported through a new partnership with BSF.

Two classes of proposals will be considered in response to this solicitation:
* RESEARCH PROPOSALS describing collaborative research projects, and
* DATA SHARING PROPOSALS to enable sharing of data and other resources.


Domestic and international projects will be considered. As detailed in the solicitation, international components of collaborative projects may be funded in parallel by the participating agencies. Opportunities for parallel funding are available for US-German Research Proposals, US-German Data Sharing Proposals; US-French Research Proposals, US-French Data Sharing Proposals; and US-Israel Research Proposals.


In addition:
* Scientific description and scope have been updated;
* Emphases and expectations for Data Sharing Proposals have been clarified; and
* In response to this solicitation, an investigator may participate as PI or Co-PI in no more than two proposals per review cycle.

 

Please be aware that significant changes have been made to the NSF Grant Proposal Guide (http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/policydocs/pappguide/nsf13001/gpg_sigchanges.jsp) to implement revised merit review criteria based on the National Science Board (NSB) report, National Science Foundation's Merit Review Criteria: Review and Revisions. While the two merit review criteria remain unchanged (Intellectual Merit and Broader Impacts), guidance has been provided to clarify and improve the function of the criteria. Changes will affect the project summary and project description sections of proposals.

 

Broad distribution of this announcement is encouraged.

Parallel documents from NIH, BMBF, ANR, and BSF are forthcoming, as well as additional information on funded projects and data sharing resources.

For further information, please visit http://www.nsf.gov/crcns/. Scientific or administrative questions may be addressed to the appropriate person in the list of agency contacts below:

 

General inquiries

Robert Tate, CRCNS Administrative Coordinator - NSF; Division of Information and Intelligent Systems, National Science Foundation, telephone: (703) 292-8767, fax: (703) 292-9073, email: rtate@nsf.gov

Kenneth Whang, CRCNS Program Coordinator - NSF; Program Director, Division of Information and Intelligent Systems, National Science Foundation, telephone: (703) 292-5149, fax: (703) 292-9073, email: kwhang@nsf.gov

 

ANR

Mathieu Girerd, Scientific Officer, Information and Communication Sciences and Technologies Department, telephone: +33 1 7354 8213, email: mathieu.girerd@agencerecherche.fr

Serawit Bruck-Landais, Scientific Officer, Biology and Health Department, telephone: +33 1 7354 8170, email: Serawit.Bruck@agencerecherche.fr

 

BMBF

Rainer Girgenrath, Projektträger im DLR für das BMBF, telephone: +49 228 3821 1200, email: rainer.girgenrath@dlr.de, web: http://www.pt-dlr.de/

 

BSF

Rachel Haring, telephone: +972-2-5828239, email: heni@bsf.org.il

Yair Rotstein, telephone: +972-2-5828239, email: yair@bsf.org.il

 

NIH

Yuan Liu, Chief, Office of International Activities; Director, Computational Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics Program, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, telephone: (301) 496-0012, email: liuyuan@ninds.nih.gov

Dennis Glanzman, Chief, Theoretical and Computational Neuroscience Research Program, National Institute of Mental Health, telephone: (301) 443-1576, email: dglanzma@mail.nih.gov

Susan Volman, Program Director, Division of Basic Neuroscience and Behavioral Research, National Institute on Drug Abuse, telephone: (301) 443-1315, email: svolman@nida.nih.gov

Michael A. Steinmetz, Program Director, Division of Extramural Research, National Eye Institute, telephone: (301) 451-2020, email: Michael.Steinmetz@nih.gov

Christopher Platt, Program Director, Central Pathways for Hearing and Balance, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, telephone: (301) 496-1804, email: plattc@nidcd.nih.gov

Grace C. Y. Peng, Program Director, Discovery Science and Technology, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, telephone: (301) 451-4778, email: penggr@mail.nih.gov

John A. Matochik, Program Director, Division of Neuroscience and Behavior, National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, telephone: (301) 451-7319, email: jmatochi@mail.nih.gov

Theresa H. Cruz, Program Officer, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, telephone: (301) 496-9233, email: cruzth@mail.nih.gov

John R. Glowa, Program Director for Neuroscience, National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, telephone: (301) 496-0527, email: glowaj@mail.nih.gov

 

NSF

Kenneth Whang, Program Director, Division of Information and Intelligent Systems, 1125S, telephone: (703) 292-5149, fax: (703) 292-9073, email: kwhang@nsf.gov

Akaysha Tang, Program Director, Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences, 995N, telephone: (703) 292-7281, email: atang@nsf.gov

Donald Hantula, Program Director, Division of Social and Economic Sciences, 995N, telephone: (703) 292-8543, email: dhantula@nsf.gov

Diane Witt, Program Director, Division of Integrative and Organismal Systems, 685S, telephone: (703) 292-7887, email: dwitt@nsf.gov

Mary Ann Horn, Program Director, Division of Mathematical Sciences, 1025N, telephone: (703) 292-4879, email: mhorn@nsf.gov

Athanassios Sambanis, Program Director, Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems, 565S, telephone: (703) 292-2161, email: asambani@nsf.gov

Jong-on Hahm, Program Director, Office of International and Integrative Activities, II-1155, telephone: (703) 292-7223, email: jhahm@nsf.gov

Robert Chadduck, Program Director, Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure, 1145S, telephone: (703) 292-2247, email: rchadduc@nsf.gov

Amy Walton, Program Director, Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure, 1145S, telephone: (703) 292-4538, email: awalton@nsf.gov


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To subscribe to the CRCNS Public Announcements list, send a blank email to CRCNS-ANNOUNCE-subscribe-request@LISTSERV.NSF.GOV
To unsubscribe send a blank email to CRCNS-ANNOUNCE-signoff-request@LISTSERV.NSF.GOV
To subscribe to CRCNS EXTRA, Information for the CRCNS Community, send a blank email to CRCNS-EXTRA-subscribe-request@LISTSERV.NSF.GOV
To unsubscribe send a blank email to CRCNS-EXTRA-signoff-request@LISTSERV.NSF.GOV

---
Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience
http://www.nsf.gov/crcns/

 

 

(05/18/2013) Free Interactive Music & the Brain Exposition – Mozart & the Mind

Free Interactive Music & the Brain Exposition – Mozart & the Mind

May 18, 2013

 

Join us Saturdays May 11, May 18, and June 1, 6:30-7:30 pm for a series of free Music & the Brain Expositions, part of Mainly Mozart's new Mozart & the Mind series. TDLC investigators Scott Makeig, Tim Mullen, Alex Khalil, Victor Mincez, and John Iversen will present, along with other scientists and musicians. "This is a unique opportunity to engage with scientists, musicians, and fellow music aficionados around a series of interactive installations exploring connections between music and the brain!" (Note: You can also purchase tickets for the complete Mozart & the Mind and Spotlight Series concert program. Discounts for UCSD community: code UCSD13). More information ...

 

 

 

(03/12/2013) TDLC Webinar: Barbara Oakley

 

TDLC Webinar: Barbara Oakley

How to Learn More Deeply and Creatively: Concrete Tools from Neuroscience and from Zombies

 

We hope you enjoyed NSF - Temporal Dynamic Learning Center's presentation
for Brain Awareness Week. For those who could not view the webinar in real
time or would like to watch the presentation again, we have recorded the
presentation.

 

Click here to watch (.mp4 file)


Thank you!

 

 

TDLC

 

Webcast viewers: To submit questions for the presenter or the panelists, please send email to:

tdlcwebinar@gmail.com

Note: Please include who the question is intended for (see below).

Presenter:
Barbara Oakley

Panelists:
Andrea Chiba
Terry Sejnowski
Paula Tallal

 

Questions asked by webcast remote viewers:

From: For: Question:
B L Barbara Are you familiar with David Souza's series of books….How the Brain Learns?

Can you share your opinion on his work if you are familiar with them?

Thanks!
     
B L Barbara Can you comment on spaced repetition for memorization? Would you recommend a way to practice this technique?

Thanks!
     
B L Barbara

You mentioned switching attention as a way to allow the brain to continue processing.

Can you give examples of the following that will help nurture healthy and free processing in the brain?
· Food

· Techniques, methodologies, tools

· Helpful lifestyle habits (e.g. amount of sleep and when, …)


Can you comment on how physical fitness relates to a healthy brain? Are there physical exercises that are more beneficial to the brain over others?

Thanks!

     
B L Anyone What can we do to improve or at least preserve our brain and its capabilities as we get older?

What can the elderly do to improve brain function?

Thanks!
     
B L Barbara What do you recommend for kids with dyslexia or special needs kids?
     
B L Anyone I've read that women have a thicker and more active corpus collosum, and, therefore, think more with their whole brain. Their ability to multitask better than men was attributed to this fact.

Can you comment on that? Truth? Fiction?

 

 

(02/18/2011) Neurology Grand Rounds

Talk: "Electric Fields in the Brain - A New Interpretation of an Old Signal"

Flavio Frohlich, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Research Associate McCormick Laboratory Yale University, School of Medicine

(UCSD Comp Neuro IGERT alumnus)

Date: Friday, February 18th
Time: 8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.
Location: The Center for Neural Circuits and Behavior

http://neurosciences.ucsd.edu/2page.php?id=GrandRounds



(03/15-16/2011) Osaka-UCSD Workshop 2011

Osaka-UCSD Workshop 2011

March 15-16, 2011 (9:00 am)

John Muir Room, Price Center East, UC San Diego

 

Cognitive Neuroscience Robotics

The Global COE “Center of Human-friendly Robotics Based on Cognitive Neuroscience” of Osaka University aims to develop new IRT (Information and Robot Technology) systems that can provide information and services based on understanding cognitive neuroscience. Cognitive neuroscience concerns meta-level brain functions such as memory and reasoning. While traditional technologies have made our society convenient, their effects on our cognitive functions have been disregarded. In order to reveal their problems and to establish a new design principle for safe and adaptable IRT systems, this Global COE integrates our world-famous research in robotics, cognitive science, and neuroscience, being conducted at Osaka University, ATR (Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International), and NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology) in Japan.

(http://www.gcoe-cnr.osaka-u.ac.jp/english/)

 

See tentative agenda here ...


Acknowledgement:

TDLC is an National Science Foundation funded Science of Learning Center. Its purpose is to understand how the
element of time and timing is critical for learning and to apply this understanding to improve educational practice.

(02/18/2011) Neurology Grand Rounds

Talk: "Electric Fields in the Brain - A New Interpretation of an Old Signal"

Flavio Frohlich, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Research Associate McCormick Laboratory Yale University, School of Medicine

(UCSD Comp Neuro IGERT alumnus)

Date: Friday, February 18th
Time: 8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.
Location: The Center for Neural Circuits and Behavior

http://neurosciences.ucsd.edu/2page.php?id=GrandRounds



(02/11/2011) Four New Fellows Are Helping to Heal the World

BY JOHN R. PLATT
Link to article...

Every year, IEEE honors some of its most noteworthy members with the prestigious distinction of Fellow. This year, 321 senior members were elevated to Fellow status, including four whose work in biomedicine and medical applications are particularly noteworthy.

THE HEART OF ENGINEERING
Dorin Panescu, chief technical officer and vice president of NewCardio, a company in San Jose, Calif., that is developing a three-dimensional approach to electrocardiography, was elevated to IEEE Fellow for his “contributions to medical devices for cardiac applications” in the application engineer category. He credits his career-long membership in the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society with influencing his success.

“EMBS has supported my career growth, from grad student to my current role,” he says. “Once I was employed in the medical device industry and in years thereafter, IEEE-EMBS also allowed me to give back by offering me opportunities to tell students and their teachers about what to expect in a biomedical engineering career and how to prepare for the field.”

With more than 250 patents to his name, and heavily published in the society’s journals with more than 100 technical articles to his name, Panescu’s work has had a tremendous impact on patients around the world. Devices based on his patents are in clinical use worldwide to treat abnormal heart rhythms, congestive heart failure, and related conditions. These devices include implantable cardiac-resynchronization devices and wireless remote patient monitors, as well as procedures involving cardiac ablation, which vaporize dysfunctional heart tissue using radio frequencies. He also has contributed to the development of implantable pacemakers and defibrillators and a 3-D ECG platform testing the safety of cardiac drugs during their development.

THE MICROFABRICATOR
Mark G. Allen has made significant strides in the field of microelectronics during the past 20 years. He was elevated to IEEE Fellow in the educator category for his “contributions to micro- and nanofabrication technologies for micromechanical systems.”

Allen has been with Georgia Tech since 1989. He is senior vice provost for research and innovation and acting director of the school’s Georgia Electronic Design Center. There he also runs the microSensors and microActuators research group, which focuses on the design, fabrication, testing, and packaging of micro-electro-mechanical systems. They’re being applied in such devices as high-temperature wireless pressure sensors in jet engines and needles for painless drug delivery.

Those microneedles led Allen and a colleague to found Redeon in 1999. The company, later acquired and absorbed by Biovalve, commercialized approaches to delivering insulin and other drugs transdermally. The microneedles cause patients no pain, because they do not pass through the dead cells of the outermost layer of the skin to the layers below that contain nerves, but penetrate deep enough to administer drugs effectively.

Allen also cofounded CardioMEMS, in Atlanta, in 2001 to commercialize wireless implantable microsensors to treat aneurysms and congestive heart failure. The company’s EndoSure wireless pressure measurement system, a hermetically sealed sensor the size of a paper clip, has been implanted into more than 6000 patients.

THE SILICON BRAIN
Neuroengineering pioneer Gert Cauwenberghs was elevated to Fellow in the research engineer category for his “contributions to integrated biomedical instrumentation.” A professor of bioengineering and biology at the University of California at San Diego, Cauwenberghs has made groundbreaking contributions to the design, implementation, and application of very-large-scale integrated silicon microchips for adaptive neural computation and sensory information processing. The chips are used in implantable neural interfaces, acoustic microarrays, and adaptive optics, as well as for biometric identification.

Much of Cauwenberghs’ research focuses on developing silicon microsystems inspired by the synaptic mechanisms of the human brain. The goals of his research, he says, are threefold: “to empower silicon integrated circuits with adaptive intelligence inspired by sensory information processing in nervous systems; to facilitate advances in computational neuroscience by large-scale emulation of neural models in parallel analog silicon circuits; and to interface silicon with neural cells for restoring lost function in sensory- and motor-impaired patients.”

Cauwenberghs also helped form the IEEE Biomedical Circuits and Systems Technical Committee. He helped launch the IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems, for which he serves as editor in chief, and he is currently senior editor of IEEE Sensors Journal.

THE CANCER FIGHTER
Battling cancer is in Larry A. Nagahara’s genes. As program director for the Physical Sciences–Oncology Centers Program at the National Cancer Institute, in Bethesda, Md., he coordinates activities related to expanding the role of the physical sciences in cancer research. He was elevated to IEEE Fellow in the technology leader category for his “leadership in nanotechnology devices and measurement applications.”

Much of Nagahara’s work has been applied to nanoelectronics and nanosensors which, he says, could have a big potential impact in biomedical applications such as the early diagnosis of cancer, monitoring a patient’s entire system, and tracking patients’ responses to treatment.

Nagahara is managing his institute’s efforts in exploring innovative approaches to better understand and control cancer, using what he calls “new, perhaps unorthodox, ways.”

In his program, 12 teams of scientists from the physical sciences, engineering, life sciences, and oncology are working together to examine cancer through new eyes. “The convergence of these often disparate areas of science is critical to better understand the physical and chemical forces that shape and govern the emergence and behavior of cancer,” he says.

As with many of this year’s Fellows, Nagahara says his participation in IEEE activities helped shape his career and understanding of his technical field. “Through IEEE activities such as conferences, I was exposed to the numerous IEEE societies,” he says. “Nanotechnology is one area that crosses many of these societies and shows how a professional society can bring together people with different expertise and perspectives to accelerate understanding and commercial application.”

For the entire list of 2011 IEEE Fellows, visit the Fellows Web site, where you can nominate a colleague for the 2012 class. Nominations are due 1 March 2011.



(11/09/2010) Injury & Illness Prevention Training

Mandatory Injury & Illness Prevention Training for INC personnel

The Institute for Neural Computation will be having an IIPP Group Training class Tuesday November 9, 2010

There are two sessions scheduled for this event.

Session 1:
IIPP Training (non-research)
9:00am-Nov. 9, 2010

Location:
San Diego Supercomputer Center, East Annex,
Level B1, South Wing, INC Main Area
Located on Hopkins Drive, next to RIMAC, facing the Eucalyptus Grove

 

Session 2:
IIPP Training (lab personnel/research)
2:00pm-Nov. 9, 2010

Location:
San Diego Supercomputer Center, East Annex,
Level B1, South Wing, INC Main Area
Located on Hopkins Drive, next to RIMAC, facing the Eucalyptus Grove

 

Lucy Dang will be coordinating the set up of the group training; however, if you wish to get training on your own before then, please feel free to do so through the UC Learning Center.

 

Learn how to access Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) safety training.

Purpose

UC San Diego developed the Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) in response to a state law that requires safety training for all employees. The program's purpose is to help employees understand and avoid on-the-job risks.

 

Requirement

All employees must attend an IIPP course once during their career at UCSD. New employees should attend within 30 days of hire. This includes student employees, graduate students, and visiting scholars who receive compensation from UCSD.

 

How to get the training

  • Laboratory/research personnel:
    • Visit the UC Learning Center and use the course catalog or search box to locate this class: Laboratory Safety Principles/IIPP
  • Non-research personnel:
    • Visit the UC Learning Center and use the course catalog or search box to locate this class: Injury and Illness Prevention Program

Group training

IIPP training can be customized for your work group and presented upon request. Group sessions are often the best use of everyone's training time, and often a successful way for supervisors and safety coordinators to get employees to a training seminar.


(10/05/2010) INC's NIH Training Grant Fellowship Welcome Reception

Date: Tuesday, October 5th

Time: 5:30pm – 7 :30pm

Location: INC Lobby, SDSC, Level B1 (east entrance off of Hopkins Dr.)

R.S.V.P. to: Luisa (m2flores@ucsd.edu) by 9/28.

*Please Note: all Predoctoral and Postdoctoral Fellows are expected to attend.

(10/03/2008) INC, TDLC, and CRL Fellowship Welcome Reception.

Institute for Neural Computation, Temporal Dynamics of Learning Center, and Center for Research in Language Fellowship Welcome Reception.


Date: Friday, October 3, 2008

Time: 4pm – 6pm

Location: Eucalyptus Point, Room B, University of California, San Diego

Resources:


MB

Faculty Spotlight

Tzyy-Ping Jung
Elevated to IEEE Fellow for contributions to blind source separation for biomedical applications.

...more info


Staff Spotlight

INC's First Annual Hike N' Lunch Event
INC staff at the Torrey Pines Glider Port overlooking the Pacific Ocean.

...see more